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Courses of Study

Requirements in Full

A brief overview of the requirements and organization of doctoral training in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience at Stony Brook University. They are intended to give prospective students an overview of the structure of our program and to help guide present students through the sequence of requirements.


Requirements in Detail

A detailed overview of the requirements and organization of doctoral training in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience at Stony Brook University. They provide more detailed information about the structure of our program and sequence of requirements. These guidelines went into effect with the Fall 2005 entering class.


Graduate Course Offerings

BNB 551 Writing Neuroscience, Fall
Seminar course for doctoral students providing practical instruction in written communication in neuroscience.  Topics include writing effective abstracts, cover letters, figure captions, grant specific aims, among others.

BNB 555 Laboratory Rotations in Neuroscience, Fall & Spring
Course for doctoral students in Neuroscience in which students participate in three formal laboratory rotations in program faculty laboratories during the first year.  Students make oral presentations for each rotation.  Instruction is provided in how to organize and present material in a seminar format, including the proper use of visual aids.  Enrollment restricted to students in the graduate Program in Neuroscience.

BNB 560 Introduction to Mammalian Neuroanatomy, Winter
This course consists of a visual presentations and supplemental lectures providing an overview of the structural organization of the nervous system. The mammalian nervous system and its sensory, motor and cognitive components are emphasized. Opportunities for examination of whole brains and histological sections, and some hands-on experience with basic neuroanatomical techniques may also be available.

BNB 561 Introduction to Neuroscience I, Fall
First of a two-semester core course introducing students to basic principles of neuroscience.  The major focus is cellular and molecular neuroscience.  Topics covered include the ionic basis of resting potentials and electrical excitability, the structure, function and molecular biology of voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, exocytosis, cellular networks, and gene regulation.

BNB 562 Introduction to Neuroscience II, Spring
Second of a two-semester core course introducing students to basic principles of neuroscience.  The major focus is systems neuroscience.  Topics covered include analyses of all of the major sensory systems, motor systems, and systems mediating higher order, cognitive functions in the nervous system.

BNB 563 Advanced Topics in Neuroscience I, Fall
This course includes one to three separate modules taught by different faculty on focused topics in neuroscience, typically focusing on synaptic plasticity and development.

BNB 564 Advanced Topics in Neuroscience II, Spring
This course includes one to three separate modules taught by different faculty on focused topics in neuroscience.

BNB 566 Neurobiology of Disease, Spring
This advanced seminar course is coordinated with the Neurobiology of Disease lecture series hosted by the Program in Neuroscience each Spring semester.  The Program invites 5-6 distinguished scientists to present research seminars organized around the broad topic of neurobiological and neurological diseases.  Students read and discuss papers recommended by the guest speakers.  This course also provides students the opportunity to meet with the guest seminar speakers.

BNB 597 Seminar Themes, Fall
This course focuses on current research topics in neuroscience and is integrated with the Nueroscience Seminar Series. It is centered on a common research theme. Students discuss manuscripts, attend seminars and meet with outside speakers.

BNB 599 Research, Fall and Spring
Original investigation undertaken with supervision of a member of the Program in Neuroscience.

BNB 655 Neuropharmacology, Spring, even years
An advanced course for graduate students interested in developing an understanding of neuropharmacology. Following a general introduction to the nerve cell structure, synaptic and chemical transmission, three themes receptors, receptors as channels, and G-protein-coupled receptors are developed. Recent advances in cell and molecular biology provide the framework for instruction and discussion.

BNB 697, Neuroscience Seminar Series, Fall and Spring
Students attend weekly seminar presentations typically given by visiting speakers. Seminars include sub-series of three to four lectures that focus on a particular topic in contemporary neuroscience.

BNB 699 Dissertation Research on Campus, Fall and Spring
Original investigations undertaken as part of the Ph.D. program under the supervision of the dissertation committee.